Making Salves, Creams, & Lip Balm - PVP42

Show Notes

There are so many recipes out there! These are just simple and easy recipes to get you started! Once you discover how easy it is you'll want to spread your wings and fly!

There are so many options and combinations of oils, butters, and fancy ingredients! If you use essential oils, always use them with care!

May this be just the beginning of a long journey making products on your homestead!

Preservatives

To be 100% clear, vitamin E, grapefruit seed extract (GSE), and essential oils are not preservatives. Yes, in some cases there might be properties that inhibit oxidation and bacterial growth and so forth, but they are not ingredients that will protect homemade products from bacteria, molds, rancidity, and so forth. On the other hand, there are preservatives that are not all bad. Consider checking out companies that carry preservatives for homemade products and perhaps one will be suitable for your needs and preferences.

When we are electing to not use preservatives we should consider:

  • Small batches that can be used quickly.
  • Refrigeration.
  • Not storing products in a hot, humid bathroom.
  • Using oils and butters that have a longer shelf life.
  • Ingredients, some are more prone to be problematic than others.
  • Using spoons or dippers to remove product from a jar rather than our hands.

Equipment

  • 4-cup pyrex measuring cup or a quart canning jar
  • Wood tongue depressor or glass stirrer
  • Saucepan
  • Scale (Strongly recommended for success making cream.)
  • Immersion blender (Preferred for creme. A whisk or handheld mixer can be substituted.) 
  • Jars, tins, or whatever you are going to package your product in. (If you are reusing containers, sterilize them in boiling water for 10 minutes.)

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Simple Lip Balm

  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil or the oil of your choice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons beeswax

Put water in the bottom of the saucepan. You'll need enough water that it doesn't all evaporate but not so much that it ends up in your product. Place the measuring cup in the saucepan. Measure the beeswax and put it in the measuring cup. Melt the beeswax under medium to low heat. Slowly add the oil while stirring. Be careful to not overheat. Pour into containers and allow to cool. 


Simple Salve

  • 1 cup oil
  • 1/4 cup beeswax

Put water in the bottom of the saucepan. You'll need enough water that it doesn't all evaporate but not so much that it ends up in your product. Place the measuring cup in the saucepan. Measure the beeswax and put it in the measuring cup. Melt the beeswax under medium to low heat. Slowly add the oil while stirring. Be careful to not overheat. Pour into containers and allow to cool. 


Simple Cream

  • 1 ounce beeswax
  • 6 ounces almond oil
  • 2.5 ounces shea butter
  • 8 ounces water (Distilled or quality filtered water is preferred so you don't introduce things that will grow in your cream, yuk!) A hydrosol and/or aloe vera juice can be substituted for all or some of the water.

Proceed as with a lip balm or salve. I prefer to use a quart canning jar for cremes as the immersion blender just fits and makes quick work of blending while making very little mess to clean up. 

After the oils and butters have been added to the beeswax and melted. Turn off the heat and remove from the stove. I like to have a trivet on standby topped with a towel so that the saucepan doesn't go slip-sliding away.

Begin making cream magic by placing the blender in the beeswax/oils/butters. While pulsing add a tad of water. Add a bit of water at a time and pulse until all the water has been added. There might be a scary moment if you add too much water at once. It's okay just pulse a bit more before adding more water. Pour into containers.

Peace.


Resources

  • Annie Berthhold-Bond (1999). Better Basics for the Home: Simple Solutions for Less Toxic Living. Three Rivers Press. ISBN: 0609803255. This book includes recipes that work for everything from milk paint and toilet bowl cleaners to lip balms and deodorants. Also included are ratings for building materials so that you can compare common options.

  • Debra Lynn Dadd (2011). Toxic Free: How to Protect Your Health and Home from the Chemicals that are Making you Sick. Tarcher. ISBN: 9781585428700. Debra is an incredible lay investigator of toxic chemicals and products. This most recent iteration of her book on living a cleaner life is just a terrific resource to keep on the bookshelf and her website is a great resource too. 

  • Rosemary Gladstar (2008). Rosemary Gladstar's Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health: 175 Teas, Tonics, Oils, Salves, Tinctures, and other Natural Rememdies for the Entire Family. Storey Publishing. ISBN: 9781603420785. Rosemary, who doesn't know? This is a must have if you are going to make remedies at home. 

Essential oils are very popular right now and there is tons of guidance on the internet and in books. Essential oils can be key ingredients in homemade products and the best resource to understand them in terms of safety is:

  • Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young (2014). Essential Oil Safety, second edition. Churchill Livingstone. ISBN: 9780443062414. If you are serious about the safe use of essential oils this book is the one and only go to book. Keep in mind that just because something is organic, from the earth, and has all sorts of wonderful properties doesn't mean that it will be safe in large quantities or over a long period of time. Consider how much plant material and so forth it takes to create essential oils.

Credits

  • Special thanks to Dale, Nia, and Steph for all the love and support! 
  • Art/Logo: Aaron Glasson, Permaculture Velocity logo! Awesome, right!?
  • Music: Mike WojniakThe Seedling, Copyright 2016, Mike Wojniak. Huge love and thanks to Mike!